S. Frederick Starr & Michael Doran

Wall Street Journal, July 11, 2021

American forces have left Afghanistan. Now what? President Biden has yet to settle on the outlines of an approach. What should the U.S. seek to achieve? Who are its partners?

As he mulls these questions, the president should take note of a July 16 conference, hosted by the government of Uzbekistan in Tashkent, on the subject of “regional connectivity.” The Uzbeks and their Central Asian neighbors, including Afghanistan, seek international diplomatic and economic support for new transport and infrastructure projects to connect their region with South and Southeast Asia.

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Published in Staff Publications

Kashgar Coerced: Forced Reconstruction, Exploitation, and Surveillance in the Cradle of Uighur Culture

This Forum event will present Uighur Human Rights Project (UHRP) report under the same title, focusing on China's policy of eradication of the Uighur cultural heritage. The speaker, Mr. Bill Drexel, has spent the last several months researching Kashgar with the Uyghur Human Rights Project, following up on his research on Chinese state surveillance as a Schwarzman Scholar at Tsinghua University from 2018 to 2019. Bill holds an MPhil from Cambridge University in Political Theory and a BA from Yale University in the Humanities. Cumulatively, he has spent the last 4 years at the intersection of religion and politics, conducting research across East Asia, South Asia, the Middle East, and Europe. 
 

Moderator: S. Frederick Starr, Chairman, Central Asia-Caucasus Institute at AFPC 

When: Wednesday, July 15, 2020 at 10am EDT

The event was live-streamed on our Facebook page and is now available on Youtube

 
Published in Forums & Events

Stockholm Institute European Policy Studies

January 2020

Svante E. Cornell and Niklas Swantström

 

China’s economic development and global impact are tilting the economic, political and military balances that have shaped the world since the end of the cold war. One fundamental step in China’s global strategy is the infrastructure project BRI. In this report, Svante E. Cornell and Niklas Swanström analyse its impact on the EU’s neighbourhood as well as on the European project. (2020:1)

 

One step in China’s global outlook is the comprehensive infrastructure project Belt and Road Initiative (BRI), opening a clear set of crossroads for the EU. The BRI project was presented by the Chinese government in 2013 as a series of trade corridors by land and sea. One major part of the project aims to connect Europe and China through Central Asia.

In this report, Svante Cornell and Niklas Swanström deliver a thorough account of the BRI’s planned infrastructure and financial setup. The authors also analyse how these trade routes affect the EU’s Eastern neighbourhood and Central Asia in relation to the rule of law and the regional political-economic development. Finally, they consider what pressure the BRI exerts on the EU system and whether the interests of China and the EU are compatible.

One conclusion is that the EU has not payed enough attention to the geopolitical dimension of their relations to the countries on the Eurasian continent. Therefore, the authors suggest that the EU should focus more on European interests, and not only on norms and values.

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A police vehicle patrols in Kashgar, China, June 25, 2017. PHOTO: JOHANNES EISELE/AGENCE FRANCE-PRESSE/GETTY IMAGES via Wall Street Journal

The Turkic people has an ancient language and traditions. Even Mao didn't expect to erase it.

By S. Frederick Starr

July 26, 2019

Published in Staff Publications
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